Why I want to stop Snoop Dog from visiting Australia

Talitha Stone, 24.

Talitha Stone, 24.

I am a 24 year old activist with grassroots organisation Collective Shout. You may know me from my anti-violence campaign against US rapper, Tyler the Creator who verbally abused me at his all ages Sydney show last year.

Just before Christmas I learned that Snoop Dogg (AKA Snoop Lion) would be kicking off a national tour for Big Day Out. Snoop has an extensive criminal history, including convictions for drugs and weapons related offences. Snoop also reportedly lured two underage girls into exposing themselves on film by offering them marijuana and ecstasy.

Snoop’s lyrics glorify violence against women. He refers to women as ‘bitches’ and ‘hoes’ who ‘suck d****’. His songs include ‘Break a bitch ’til the day i die’ and ‘Can you control yo hoe? where he describes beating women who do not obey him, who need to learn their place. He justifies violence against women because their behaviour ‘forced him’. These are the very cultural attitudes that both excuse and perpetuate actual violence against women. These lyrics trivialise violence against women and they desensitise young men to the real pain and suffering of victims of abuse.

Snoop Dogg performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards 2013 at the Boisfeuillet Jones Atlanta Civic Center on September 28, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Prince Williams/FilmMagic)

Snoop Dogg performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards 2013 at the Boisfeuillet Jones Atlanta Civic Center on September 28, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Prince Williams/FilmMagic) Photo: Prince Williams

The Australian Immigration guidelines on controversial visa applicants says that we can and will reject  people “whose presence in Australia may, because of their activities, reputation, known record or the cause they represent and propagate, vilify or incite discord in the Australian community, or represent a danger to the Australian community or a segment of that community.”

Snoop has been refused entry to Australia before because of his criminal history. Britain, Norway and the Netherlands also wouldn’t let him in.

I created a new petition on change.org calling on Immigration Minister Scott Morrison to revoke Snoop Dogg’s (AKA Snoop Lion) visa, as I believe his long criminal record, his insolent admission of sex trafficking (“selling pussy”) and his glorification of violence against women do not meet the character requirements for an Australian Visa. Morrison has declined to revoke Snoop’s visa.

He is proud of his behaviour and openly discusses. In a Rolling Stone article last year he described his involvement in trafficking in the following way:

“I could fire a b*tch, f*ck a b*tch, get a new ho: it was my program. City to city, titty to titty, hotel room to hotel room, athlete to athlete, entertainer to entertainer.”

I am not unfamiliar with the barrage of rape and death threats hurled at any woman that dare question any misogynistic artist. My criticism of Tyler the Creator for rapping about raping, murdering and chopping up women was met with an onslaught of online harassment and threats, including the publication of what was believed to have been my home address.

Since starting my petition against Snoop Dogg almost on cue I started to receive hate and threats online. A few people have suggested I should be killed for trying to ban his entry another suggested someone be hired to “cut my tits off”.

In refusing to act on behalf of women, Scott Morrison has contradicted our National Plan to address violence against women. Our Government spends millions of dollars in attempts to eradicate domestic and sexual violence while at the same time is rolls out the red carpet to artists who promote it.

Being a young woman in this country is becoming increasingly more dangerous, with 1 in 3 being victims of violence and 1 in 3 sexually assaulted. I want a Government that has the protection and wellbeing of women held in higher priority than approving the visa of a powerful entertainer, with incredible influence that glorifies such traumatic and life-altering things.

As a society do we care more about music and entertainment that degrades women than women’s safety and wellbeing?

I may not have seen our Government take action this time around, although I hope we won’t have to wait too much longer for someone to take violence against women seriously. 

 

49 comments

  • You've raised some good points here. It's not a question of free speech it's a question of whether we should grant a visa to someone who will impact negatively on our country.

    Commenter
    C.H.
    Location
    Sydney
    Date and time
    January 17, 2014, 8:55AM
    • does the op also protest against the economic hardship and extreme bridge between rich and poor where violence is the norm? or rather attempt to succeed in achieving symbolic gestures whilst the internet marches across visa conditions...

      Commenter
      confused
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 11:28AM
    • Thanks a million for standing up again Talitha!!! I'm fully with you on this. Young people (and adults) are very impressionable and go through teenage years doing stupid things they regret later. Then there are those hardened ones like those criticizing you on this column who naively think it's better to stick our heads in the sand, or educate parents, or that censoring their lowlife idols like the Dogg will not make an iota of difference. They're wrong! Don't let them scare or sway you. They hide behind each other's skirts chained to their devices in an unrealistic cyberworld. None of them would be man enough like you to stand up to idiots like Dogg and Tyler because they have their own misogyny and male chauvinism issues and the music lyrics stoke their weird egos.

      If the shoe were on the other foot? Would Dogg and Tyler and their mindless fans like it if women started using the same language and sentiments against them?

      Commenter
      John D
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 1:04PM
    • "does the op also protest against the economic hardship and extreme bridge between rich and poor where violence is the norm? or rather attempt to succeed in achieving symbolic gestures whilst the internet marches across visa conditions..."

      You mean the poor, like the poor women who are forced into prostitution to survive or pimped out by men like this? There is certainly an extreme bridge between them and rich men like Snoop who profit from their misery and pain.

      Commenter
      Kat
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 3:58PM
  • Talitha, just because Snoop is allowed in the country doesn't mean we as a society take violence against women seriously.

    Commenter
    Lazor
    Date and time
    January 17, 2014, 9:09AM
    • While I believe (hope, pray) that you have left out the word "not" from your comment - what you have written is entirely accurate...violence against women is not taken seriously.

      Commenter
      Kate
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 12:43PM
  • This matter was discussed on the SMH a few days ago, with a majority of comments being opposed to the petition - not because people support Snoop, or violence against women, but simply because people need to be trusted to make their own decisions.

    Prohibition of the type being proposed here will not make any difference to the alarming statistics quoted. What will is continued education around why violence (not just against women) is simply wrong.

    I also take umbrage with some of the statements made. Allowing someone to enter the country can hardly be described as "rolling out the red carpet" and the claim that 1 in 3 women is sexually assaulted doesn't appear to be backed up by any research. 1 in 1,000,000 is too high a number, but the argument loses effectiveness when it moves into the sensational.

    Just my $0.02

    Commenter
    Thomas
    Date and time
    January 17, 2014, 9:15AM
    • "This matter was discussed on the SMH a few days ago, with a majority of comments being opposed to the petition - not because people support Snoop, or violence against women, but simply because people need to be trusted to make their own decisions"

      And that's what it amounts to. I don't need the morality police telling me what I should and shouldn't be offended about, I can make that judgement for myself.

      Commenter
      CateO
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 1:09PM
    • The scary part is that you seem to assume that the figure is wrong, just because it is so startlingly (sensationally) high. That's exactly the way that Freud decided to write off a few more generations of women as hysterical liars when they reported that they had been sexually abused by family members. He independently decided that, geez, it just couldn't be that common, could it? So he invented the Electra complex. It was decades before the real situation began to be exposed.

      I, on the other hand, find the figures to be all too believable. In a conversation between women where sexual assault is brought up, it's incredibly alarming how many will mention their own experiences. Why would I disbelieve them?

      Commenter
      Red Pony
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 1:10PM
    • @Thomas "...people need to be trusted to make their own decisions.

      Prohibition of the type being proposed here will not make any difference to the alarming statistics quoted."

      Yeeess...but I'm not sure that the key objection to misogynistic rappers like this guy is that they influence other people to misogynistic acts, but just that they're indecent twerps whose behaviour/language/attitudes is unacceptable, and can't be excused even by artistic licence. There is no good reason on the planet to allow people to rap about abusing women.

      This is in line with the guidelines for rejecting visas, as quoted in the article, which refer to people “whose presence in Australia may, because of their activities...vilify ... the Australian community". Aren't women a part of the Australian community?

      The same reasoning could be applied to other segments of the community...imagine if a someone wanted to come to Australia and rap about abusing gay people, or people of a different race to his/hers...would that be acceptable?

      Commenter
      meness
      Date and time
      January 17, 2014, 1:21PM

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