La Moss on the cover

La Moss on the cover.

Kate Moss used to live by one maxim: never complain, never explain. Well, she probably lived by more than one. 'Hey Guvnor, pass us the fags' for example, might also be up on her list of words to live by.

We digress.

Well, Kate moss has finally opened up - in quite some detail  - for the first time to Vanity Fair magazine. And the whole piece is absolutely delicious.

On having 'facial tourettes':

“I don’t want to be myself, ever. I’m terrible at a snapshot. Terrible. I blink all the time. I’ve got facial Tourette’s. Unless I’m working and in that zone, I’m not very good at pictures, really."

 “On my wedding day, I’m like freaking out, obviously. ‘You’ve got to give me a character.’ And [Galliano] said, ‘You have a secret—you are the last of the English roses. Hide under that veil. When he lifts it, he’s going to see your wanton past!’”


On the (now infamous) 1992 Calvin Klein photo shoot:

“I had a nervous breakdown when I was 17 or 18, when I had to go and work with Marky Mark and Herb Ritts,” she says. “It didn’t feel like me at all. I felt really bad about straddling this buff guy. I didn’t like it. I couldn’t get out of bed for two weeks. I thought I was going to die. I went to the doctor, and he said, ‘I’ll give you some Valium,’ and Francesca Sorrenti, thank God, said, ‘You’re not taking that.’ It was just anxiety. Nobody takes care of you mentally. There’s a massive pressure to do what you have to do."

On her ex Johnny Depp:

“There’s nobody that’s ever really been able to take care of me. Johnny did for a bit. I believed what he said,” Moss says. “Like if I said, ‘What do I do?,’ he’d tell me. And that’s what I missed when I left. I really lost that gauge of somebody I could trust. Nightmare. Years and years of crying. Oh, the tears!”

On getting 'Mossed':

“People that don’t know me get Mossed. It means, I was gonna go home, but then I just got led astray. In the best possible way, of course. I mean, it’s always fun, and a good time.” Her friend Jess Hallett counters, “It can be a nightmare if you’re the only one there. ‘Please can we go home?’ ‘No.’” On one such night in South Africa, “I remember phoning downstairs,” says Hallett, “and saying, ‘Can we have an alarm call for seven ᴀ.ᴍ., please?’ They said, ‘That’s in five minutes, madam.’ And we had to wait for this jet, in this hangar in South Africa, in this awful heat. We hadn’t been to sleep. We were literally lying with our faces on the concrete, trying to keep cool.”

Source: Vanity Fair