The most sexist requests I've had as a beauty therapist

These demands from men are upsetting, particularly when the woman ends up having to pay for the beauty treatments.

These demands from men are upsetting, particularly when the woman ends up having to pay for the beauty treatments.

"I've finally found the one. She's perfect; I had the best sex all night but as soon as she walked away I noticed she had a hairy a---."

These were the musings of a love-struck Romeo right before he asked Melbourne beauty therapist Lissette Bond to talk his new girlfriend into getting her 'dog's tail' waxed.

He booked his girlfriend in for a facial, a manicure and bikini wax and requested that Bond 'inspire' the woman to also get the hair on the crack of her bottom waxed because he didn't like to look of it.

Bond, who has been a beauty therapist for 13 years says it's not uncommon for men to demand their partners get waxed. And she doesn't even have to be at work to get requests.

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"One time at Bunnings, I saw one of my regulars. Her husband saw me and he said, "Please take her with you and fix her up". He literally gave me his wife and some money, right there and then, so I could wax her head to toe.'

Bond says she finds these demands from men quite upsetting, particularly when the woman ends up having to pay for the beauty treatments.

"I think it should be your choice. If you're going to get anything removed it should be because you want to," she says.

It's difficult to see where love, much less respect, can factor into a relationship when a man wants to turn his partner into his custom-manicured sex doll.

Psychologist and director of BodyMatters Australasia Sarah McMahon says modifying a partner's body to satisfy particular sexual desires highlights a tremendous internalised privilege and sense of entitlement.

"It shows a preoccupation with the experience of the male rather than seeing the sexual experience as joint and pleasurable."

McMahon says that these sorts of waxing demands should be a massive red flag for women. It suggests a man who isn't interested in his partner being an equal party in the relationship.

"Controlling a woman's body is one of many ways that a man may attempt to control a woman. Often it occurs more covertly then actively interfering with a partner's beauty treatments, for example, suggesting a partner diets 'for health reasons' or criticising their appearance," she says.

Bond says that she finds it most upsetting when young women feel the need to modify their bodies to meet their partner's demands.

"I'm a mother now, so I try to counsel them. I say, 'Do you make him wax?' and she will say 'No'."

So what should you do if your partner prioritises his rigid sexual desires over your control over your own body?

Psychologist Sarah McMahon says that in many cases, leaving them can be the best option.

"Men who make such demands are unlikely to change in their sense of entitlement and expectations of their partner without a crisis — or a considerable amount of counselling and education," she says.

Kasey Edwards is a writer and best-selling author. www.kaseyedwards.com