Conceiving after a miscarriage

"Women who have miscarried can be so desperate to conceive again that this can eclipse everything else in their lives."

"Women who have miscarried can be so desperate to conceive again that this can eclipse everything else in their lives." Photo: Getty

Q.  After having a miscarriage two months ago I want to try and conceive again. I am still very sad. But I’m hearing conflicting advice on when is the right time. Should we wait a little longer?

A. There is no consistency to recommendations regarding timing the ideal interval for conception to occur after miscarriage. There are just too many individual variables for individual couples. Some women long to conceive again very quickly and find this helps to assist with their grieving. Others are keen to wait for some months and see this time as an opportunity to heal both physically and emotionally.

Depending on the cause for your miscarriage (bearing in mind that in the majority of cases the reason is unclear), this will determine what your choices may be. If you were very early in your first trimester then perhaps you may want to conceive again more quickly than if you were at a later stage. Statistically, up to 60 per cent of women conceive again within one year.

Medical recommendations vary, though it is generally felt that waiting three months gives a clearer idea of the dating of a subsequent pregnancy. It also helps with separating one pregnancy from the other.  If investigations are necessary regarding the causes of miscarriage, it can take some months before these are finalised, particularly genetic studies. This can also delay plans to conceive again.   Other issues to consider are your age as well as your partner’s feelings.

Advertisement

Women who have miscarried can be so desperate to conceive again that this can eclipse everything else in their lives. It pays to have a balanced life where possible. Psychological counselling can be immensely helpful during periods of emotional pain and loss.

Jane Barry is a registered nurse, midwife and child health nurse. The advice offered is general and not intended as a substitute for professional, individual assessment and guidance.