Robin Thicke tones down <i>Blurred Lines</i> performance at the 2013 BET Awards.

Robin Thicke tones down Blurred Lines performance at the 2013 BET Awards. Photo: Getty Images

Robin Thicke's latest single Give It 2 U may once again inflame critics who have previously suggested that his Blurred Lines chart-topper is "degrading to women".

Give It 2 U features rapper Kendrick Lamar spitting rhymes about "d--k love", while Thicke sings about having "a little Thicke for you/ a big kiss for you/ I got a hit for you/ big d--k for you/ let me give it to you”. The music video has yet to be released.

Look, it's not the most degrading lyrics we've ever heard, nor the most saucy but we have to wonder, given this and the Blurred Lines music video, what is Robin overcompensating for?

Is this how he takes on Justin Timberlake? Ok, we understand that if you want to make sure your music video gathers buzz it has to include some old fashioned objectification of women and we know that Parrell Williams, bless him, doesn't make a song if it's not about sex, but there comes a point, dear lads, when it kinda sorta feels like maybe you didn't get the attention from women you craved when you were younger?

Answer us honestly: were you or were you not called a nerd by the pretty girls?

In April, Feminist in LA blogger Lisa Huynh posted that Thicke's "new rape song" Blurred Lines "is disgusting— though admittedly very catchy".

Andrea Warner of CBC Music blog agreed, saying: "It's a catchy song, but that video, which has been described as rape-y by a number of women recently (including me), is a disturbing wonderland of male privilege, with Thicke whispering in a naked woman's ear, 'I know you want it,' over and over and over again."

His original music video for the single was so racy executives at YouTube banned it from airing in April.

The clip featured Thicke surrounded by a gaggle of models as they stripped down to little more than nude underwear, cleverly covering themselves as they crossed the screen.

He eventually released a second, less provocative, version with women wrapped in clear plastic but that didn't altogether help, with critics suggesting that they looked "like the disposable dolls Thicke thinks they are".

Thicke responded to the criticisms by joking that “of course” the track is “degrading to women” in a GQ interview.

"Because all three of us [Pharrell Williams and T.I inclusive] are happily married with children, we were like, 'We're the perfect guys to make fun of this'," he said. “What a pleasure it is to degrade a woman. I've never gotten to do that before. I've always respected women. So we wanted to turn it over on its head and make people go, 'Women and their bodies are beautiful. Men are always gonna want to follow them around.' ”

Robin?

This kind of defence is confusing at best.

Thicke joked about the controversy surrounding Blurred Lines earlier this month.

The singer said his wife, actress Paula Patton, gave her seal of approval before he started work on the promo. Dear reader, what else is Paula going to say?

He was also left rather unimpressed by his beautiful co-stars.

"There are three girls, so mathematically that's three pairs of boobs," is how Thicke successfully dehumanised the women to Heat magazine.

"But, to be honest - and I've got to be honest - I've been around a lot of boobs. My wife has one of the most amazing pair of boobs you could ever see, so these ones didn't knock my socks off."

Do you see what we're saying here? The emperor is deeply insecure!

- with CM

DailyStyle