Listen to the first episode of Clementine Ford's new podcast, 'The Misandry Hour'

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Jenny Noyes

Clementine Ford's message to men: "If you need to call me a man-hater or misandrist to justify the fact that you're ...

Clementine Ford's message to men: "If you need to call me a man-hater or misandrist to justify the fact that you're actually terrified of women achieving gender equality, then I feel sorry for you." Photo: Supplied

Ah, misandry. The slander levelled at women who've been fighting for their rights since the dawn of feminism: It's not about equality or freedom. It's just that they 'hate men'.

'Misandry' is a word made up of the Greek terms 'misos' (hatred) and 'andros' (man). Although understood to be a parallel for 'misogyny', the word only came into use during the 1800s, unlike its ancient feminine original.

And that shouldn't come as any surprise - as Clementine Ford points out in her brand new podcast, The Misandry Hour, which comes highly recommended to all bra burning witches who enjoy the flavour of male tears.

Misandry is presented by defenders of patriarchy as the parallel opposite of misogyny, Ford points out, but in fact the opposite of misogyny is equality. The name of the podcast, therefore, should not be read as literally advocating 'misandry'. 

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"The Misandry Hour is - for those who don't get it already - a tongue-in-cheek joke about how terrified some people seem to be when women work together and value other women's work," Ford explains in her intro. "Feminism isn't an attempt to secure supremacy for women, but gender equality will present a loss for the men who are used to having unquestioned power."

And Clem has a message to men: "if you need to call me a man-hater or misandrist to justify the fact that you're actually terrified of women achieving gender equality, then I feel sorry for you."

Ford's guests for the first episode are Cecilia Winterfox, a feminist writer and musician, men's behavioural change practitioner Ada Conroy, and Yassmin Abdel-Magied - mechanical engineer, social activist and self-confessed petrol head.

In it, they discuss the context of misandry and how "it doesn't really pose the threat that we think it does".

So bookmark this one among your favourite femmo podcasts and take some time to enjoy the discussion.