Interior of the the Majed by Alexa Chung SS13 in store event last month in New York City.

Interior of the the Majed by Alexa Chung SS13 in store event last month in New York City. Photo: Andrew H. Walker

Showrooming. The phenomenon of trying on those jeans or testing that e-reader in-store before going home and buying it for cheaper online. You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who isn’t doing it these days. And, according to this infographic, it’s saving us a lot of money. Duh!

With 25% of showroomers saving anything in-between $50 and $100 and 57% of discount-savvy shoppers heading to Amazon, where a whopping 75% of products are cheaper, it makes perfect sense. The downside, however, is that that it’s putting indie brands and boutiques without e-commerce in a pinch.

Could showrooming be the future of retail? Well, it sure looks that way, and the change in consumer behaviour is forcing retailers to adapt. A number of stores have begun to charge a fitting fee, while others are offering specialist advice and “diagnoses” by sales assistants to induce sales and price matching.

Customer shops in store for the Majed by Alexa Chung line (also available online).

Customer shops in store for the Majed by Alexa Chung line (also available online). Photo: Andrew H. Walker

Like handing over a fistful of coupons to the cashier, there’s still an element of guilt and embarrassment that goes along with showrooming. With such immense savings to be made, however, the only way retailers can really beat the problem is by offering a personal experience one can’t get online.

How do you think the shopping experience can be enhanced?

DailyStyle