Tavi Gevinson had the perfect response to an ageist insult from The Sartorialist

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Kathleen Lee Joe

Don't even think of messing with this girl.

Don't even think of messing with this girl.

Tavi Gevinson, legit queen of everything cool, smart and fan-girly, has had to cop of lot of flak from the fashion industry, especially in her early blogging days. The publishing phenom first rose to fame at just 12 because of her blog, The Style Rookie. The industry watched on as she posted photos of her thrifted ensembles and blogged with an ever-positive voice on topics such as pop culture, high-fashion and navigating the treacherous waters of teenhood. Sometimes, they had some not-to-nice things to say about it.

One of her critics was Scott Schuman, otherwise known as The Sartorialist. During an interview for The Talk in 2011, Schuman undermined Gevinson's success, pinned it down to a "conspiracy" and said she could not possibly understand her subject matter due to her age.

"Well I don't think her audience is that big. I think her success is a little bit of a conspiracy by established print media that wanted to show that this blog thing is not that important, that it's done by a bunch of twelve year olds. But a lot of us are serious grown-ups. I think it's great that Tavi can create a blog and write for other people that are like-minded - probably other kids around her age - but I don't know how that is going to help a 26-year old, if she has never had a boyfriend or any of that kind of stuff. She's just a kid, so she can talk about art and stuff only in an abstract way … It is like a five-year-old Michael Jackson singing about love — to him they are just words."

Schuman, proud father of two daughters, delivering verbal burns to teenage girls. What a charmer! When presented with that quote by The Talk this week, Gevinson gave a response that was too perfect – thoroughly insightful, but with that bitchy zing at the end.

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"That young people don't have valid thoughts about the world because they haven't been alive long enough is sadly a very popular and, frankly, unoriginal sentiment. When I think about that time, I was just responding to the world around me. And I was perceptive enough that I felt like I could make connections to things in my life. I don't think it was abstract. And I am basically skeptical of any adults who have those kinds of things to say about young people because it seems to always very transparently stem from fear and insecurity. And to be honest, the fact that he's shorter than me in real life." Scott, allow us to direct you this way

If ever someone insults you with those some ageist babble, just imagine angel-faced Tavi whispering retorts from atop your shoulder.