Satirical fashion blog LadyPockets shows you how to get Julia Gillard's look

Get the look: Julia Gillard.

Get the look: Julia Gillard.

Have you ever wondered where you can buy Maya Angelou’s bonnet or get your hands on an every-season abala inspired by Malala Yousafzai? Well, now you know thanks to LadyPockets, the fashion blog like no other.

A worthy distraction from work, LadyPockets takes the fashion blogging genre and turns it on its head. The satirical website deconstructs the fashion of influential female leaders, from Jane Goodall and Hillary Clinton, to Condaleeza Rice and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The brainchild of twenty-something writer/costume designer/genius Katherine Fritz – the blogger behind I Am Begging My Mother Not To Read This Blog – it was started as a side project in between freelance gigs.  

Trend watch: statement scarves.

Trend watch: statement scarves.

"Instead of writing the great American Novel, I made a fake fashion + lifestyle blog where I tell you where to buy Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s earrings," she wrote.

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As for the name, “I wanted something that sounded sort of cute and whimsical and silly but also sounded a little like a euphemism for a vagina,” she recently told MTV.

Among the highlights, there’s “get the look” style guides based on Angela Merkel and our very own Julia Gillard, with tongue-in-cheek gems such as this one: “We adore Julia’s bold choices in blazer fashion almost as much as we love her now-famous takedown speech railing against sexism in politics.” And Fritz settles the Joan Didion versus Harper Lee “who wore it best” spectacles debate once and for all.

Fashion challenge: Didion v Lee.

Fashion challenge: Didion v Lee.

The blog, of course, is meant to be a joke, but its content comments on a greater issue – that whenever a woman’s in power, her clothes, hair and accessories inevitably receive way more attention than they should.

On the blog’s raison d'être, Fitz says: “I hope that in some small way, this project can make us step back from our magazines and computer screens and say, ‘Wow, yeah, the way we talk about women's bodies and women's clothing choices instead of their accomplishments is really dumb.’”

Indeed, the women featured are fierce, competent, brilliant leaders. They may be higher up than many men and serve in a role previously held by a guy, but they’re still scrutinised for things as trivial as their penchant for pantsuits, scrunchies and double-breasted jackets. And there’s something seriously whack with that.